Combination treatment with migrastatic inhibitors to target brain tumour spread

Abstract

A Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), a malignant brain tumour, ranks highly among the most aggressive cancers. This study explored the effects of the anti-migratory drugs, CCG-1423 and Rhosin hydrochloride, on the motility of cancerous cells. Scratch wound and tumour spheroid assays were conducted on untreated and treated U87 glioma cells to observe the extent of migration. The migratory cells from the assays were fixed with paraformaldehyde to assess the expression levels and distribution of actin and focal adhesions with confocal imaging. 

CCG-1423 and Rhosin hydrochloride used in combination were shown to significantly decrease the migration of tumour cells by targeting two different pathways (p = 0.004, 0.0098 and 0.0021). Treated cells showed different fluorescence levels of actin and focal adhesions in comparison to untreated cells. In the presence of the drugs, actin was more highly condensed within the cell surface and the focal adhesions became more pronounced with less co-localisation of the two. This research has paved the way for future studies, in which antimigratory drugs have the potential to be used at the surgical site, complementary to conventional treatment, to ultimately prevent the onset of secondary tumours.

Keywords

Cancer, Migration, Rhosin hydrochloride, CCG-1423, Brain Tumour, Glioblastoma Multiforme

How to Cite

Butler H., (2021) “Combination treatment with migrastatic inhibitors to target brain tumour spread”, Fields: journal of Huddersfield student research 7(1). doi: https://doi.org/10.5920/fields.823

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Authors

Hayley Butler (University of Huddersfield)

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

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This article has been peer reviewed.

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