Colonial Trauma in Márquez and Rushdie’s Magical Realism

Abstract

Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude and Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children are hallmarks of the genre of magical realism. A typically problematic genre in terms of classification, this article looks at magical realism from a Freudian perspective, with particular reference to Freud’s notion of The Uncanny. Freud’s notion of uncanniness deals in displacement; it is uncomfortable, haunting and cyclical. The dominant presence of such uncanny effects in magical realist literature, I argue, reveals the haunting presence of colonial trauma within the current postcolonial psyche.

How to Cite

Miller R. (2015) “Colonial Trauma in Márquez and Rushdie’s Magical Realism”, Fields: journal of Huddersfield student research. 1(1). doi: https://doi.org/10.5920/fields.2015.1113

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Rachel Miller

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This article has been peer reviewed.

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